Chickpea Soup with Harissa

Chickpea Soup with Harissa

As it is often the case with my dishes, I am giving you merely suggestions of quantities. I am going to show you the method, but if you feel like you should play with the proportions there is nothing stopping you other than your own preferences.

Calzone

Calzone

Right Folks,

I prefer to make the calzone pizzas over the open-faced ones. This is not because I think the calzone is a superior variety; instead, the reasons are practical. Unless you are making a single pizza, you really shouldn’t bother if you don’t have a pizza oven. Sad truth, I know, but it is what it is. The way I go about making the calzones is to make a few and place them instantly on the incredibly hot stone. Cook for 4 minutes then take them out and put them on a tray. I finish by cooking them “en masse”.

Whole Baked Salmon

Whole Baked Salmon

Right Folks,

Here is a good one. This dish has an absolutely wonderful texture, and with the vegetables piled on top it really is a showpiece on the table. It is also a cool dish for camping trips because it is so easy to make. I had the idea for this dish after watching a Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall TV show where he nailed a side of salmon to a board and left it up right by a bone fire. As you will see, I gave it a little Asian twist.

Pearl Couscous/Israeli Couscous Salad

Pearl Couscous/Israeli Couscous Salad

I am a huge fan of the Levantine cuisine, it is one of my favourites really, and I will get into all the reasons why in another post. With this weeks recipe I am giving you a nice little example if perhaps not the most emblematic one. This is a lovely, fragrant and healthy dish made with pearl couscous. I am keeping it fully plant-based by adding several raw and cooked vegetables, some herbs, olive oil and lemon. It is quite simple and simply delicious.

Michael's Rice Balls

Michael's Rice Balls

I love a good cookbook. I have probably too many at home in France and a rotation of current favourites that I take with me on board. It’s nice to leaf through a well-written cookbook, especially because I don’t always have a fast WiFi going. One of my favourite cook books in recent times has been Momofuko, the first book by a chef called David Chang, named after his first restaurant in New York. The book is a great source of base recipes, dressing and sauces that you can use anytime, anywhere.

Lancashire Hotpot

Lancashire Hotpot

Here is a recipe for a Lancashire Hotpot. I made this the other day using lamb shoulder. You can use lamb leg if you want. Preferably no bones, I have seen in a restaurant once a Lancashire Hotpot made with lamb shoulder and lamb cutlets. It created a lovely presentation, however the cutlets were a bit dry. We are not using them here. You need some sort of stock, lamb stock ideally but I use a mixture of veal stock and chicken stock. For the folks at home just use some of the liquid stock you can find on supermarket shelves. Well, the beef or veal at least.

Working on a Superyacht: Crew food during a crossing

Working on a Superyacht: Crew food during a crossing

Crew food on a trans-Atlantic voyage. This one is a more of an industry-specific post aimed at my fellow chefs at sea and anyone out there considering becoming one, but it is, I think, an interesting glimpse behind scenes too. It is essentially about provisioning and cooking in less than perfect conditions. Or, in my case, it’s about making sure you have all you need to keep a dozen people well-fed for two (often very long) weeks at sea.